Loud & Proud – Why Reading Out Loud in MFL Works Amazingly Well.

Got to be honest. I’m not a fan of choral repetition with pictures. You know, the silly voices, one word at a time. I find it all a bit patronising. The efficacy of the choral repetition approach soon wears off too, I find, as kids get older and they tire of barking at pretty pictures on the screen. So no, choral repetition, in the main, it’s not for me.

But I do love to get kids reading aloud. I love to get kids analysing the written word and linking it to the spoken word. I do a lot of dual text work, that is, side by side English and French texts where every single word is translated. the English translations are often a bit ‘dodgy’ to reflect French syntax. So, for example: j’ai joué au foot, is translated as, I’ve played at foot. J’ai les yeux bleus becomes I’ve the eyes blue. My Y7 readily say, ‘Franchment mon prof de français me tape sur les nerfs et c’est le moins qu’on puisse dire’ which translates as ‘ My teacher of French me taps on the nerves, it’s the least that one can say.’ The English and French syntax are completely transparent. There’s no guess work. Kids know the English is ‘dodgy’. I equate it to Google translate. You kind of get it but it sounds a bit weird.

What’s lovely is, is that kids ask loads of real linguist questions. So Sir, if I took off X and added Y would that mean Z? They understand every word so they can deconstruct & reconstruct the language.

Also, since they’re reading the written word lots, their pronunciation is really, really good. I’m very explicit about pronunciation. I’m very explicit about the repetitive nature of language, about the very limited number of letter combinations that are recycled again & again. I’ve very tight when it comes to silent letters and liaisons.

The kids now roll a pretty mean ‘r’, silent letters at the end of words don’t phase them, their liaisons are pretty impressive too, pretty natural in fact. They are very good with silent ‘ll’ and the silent ‘h’. “C’est évident ” they tell me with confidence and excellent prononciation.  They also tell me,  ” les lettres ‘nt’ à la fin sont muettes”. They’re great at that, using French to comment upon the language itself.

They’re good at all this, in part, because we read extended texts lots, I read out loud lots, they read out loud lots, we use dual texts lots. There are lots of reasons they’re doing so well. But lots of access to the written word and transparent silly, memorable literal syntax is central.

You may disagree but, as my Y7 say, in beautifully pronounced French, “My teacher of French me takes the head. Frankly he himself takes for the belly button of the world. It’s the least that one can say.”

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